Starting and Staying in Christ

How many times puns you heard about better vision in 2020? “Eye can’t wait to see them all.” “I can’t wait till New Year’s Day 2021, then I can say that hindsight really is 2020.” Haha. On a serious note, by God’s grace, we will see him and his truths more clearly, and others will see his fruit in us. I am devoting the year to a study of the Fruit of the Spirit based on Galatians 5:22-24: “…love, joy, peace, patience, kindness, goodness, faithfulness, gentleness, self-control; against such things there is no law. And those who belong to Christ Jesus have crucified the flesh with its passions and desires.” Perhaps you, like me, need to remember that Christ has already transformed our inner beings, desires, and characters to conform to his. We need gospel reminders to keep our true identity in Christ in mind as we navigate the year. So we’ll explore the power of the fruit growing in us, ripening to maturity for the strength and power we need to remain in Christ, to live for him and his kingdom—our mission on earth. Warning: gardening metaphors and parables will abound.

Before we delve into the particular fruit that the Spirit cultivates in us, let’s prepare the soil of our hearts and minds. No gardener worth her salt will plant seeds or shoots in unfriendly, hard ground. Nor will any fruit grow in us just because we decide it should. Israel tried and failed. “The Old Testament frequently uses the vineyard or vine as a symbol for Israel, God’s covenant people, especially in two’ vineyard songs’ in Isaiah (Isa. 5:1–7; 27:2–6)…Israel’s failure to produce fruit resulted in divine judgment…[But] the OT prophets envisioned a time when God’s people would ‘blossom and put forth shoots and fill the whole world with fruit.’” (1) Then, in the New Testament Gospel of John, we find Jesus applying the image to himself. “I am the true vine, and my Father is the vinedresser. Every branch in me that does not bear fruit he takes away, and every branch that does bear fruit he prunes, that it may bear more fruit. Already you are clean because of the word that I have spoken to you. Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit by itself, unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in me. I am the vine; you are the branches. Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing. If anyone does not abide in me he is thrown away like a branch and withers; and the branches are gathered, thrown into the fire, and burned. If you abide in me, and my words abide in you, ask whatever you wish, and it will be done for you. By this my Father is glorified, that you bear much fruit and so prove to be my disciples.” (John 15:1-8) Now the body of believers has fulfilled the prophecy of God’s productive, living vineyard.

What does this mean for us Christians? For one thing, the blessings of our Christian faith result from a continuous life lived in Christ. Secondly, our faith in Jesus is strengthened by remaining in his love and power; he is our life-giver. Third, God maintains our spiritual health to be productive because we are consecrated to him. And finally, we encourage others by our kingdom living, by abiding in Christ. Jesus Christ is the true vine, just as he is the true bread (John 6:32), and the true tabernacle (Hebrews 8:2). Here are facts of our faith: Jesus is the true vine; God is the gardener who maintains the branches to bear more fruit. And we are good (clean) because God has elected us in Christ. Calvin writes: “Can anyone who is engrafted into Christ be without fruit? ‘And every branch that beareth, fruit he pruneth.’ By these words, he shows that believers need incessant culture that they may be prevented from degenerating; and that they produce nothing good, unless God continually apply his hand; for it will not be enough to have been once made partakers of adoption, if God do not continue the work of his grace in us…When he says that vines are pruned, that they may yield more abundant fruit, he shows what ought to be the progress of believers in the course of true religion.” (2)

The blessings of our Christian faith result from a continuous life lived in Christ. Abide is a keyword of John 15:1-8, but is not a word we use in everyday language. Abide means “…to remain, abide…in reference to place: to sojourn, tarry…not to depart…to continue to be present…to be held, kept, continually…to continue to be, not to perish, to last, endure…of persons, to survive, live…to remain as one, not to become another or different…to wait for, await one…” (3) While most commentators consider “remain” to be the primary meaning of abide in our par passage, I think we might view our life in Christ as doing all of the above. Our faith in Jesus is strengthened by remaining in his love and power. He is our life-giver.

God stimulates our spiritual health to be productive after consecrating us. “There are two things that the Father is said to do in his care of the vine. First, he is said to ‘cut off’ every branch that does not bear fruit. The word ‘airo’ has four basic meanings…1. to lift up or pick up; 2. to lift up figuratively, as in lifting up one’s eyes or voice; 3. to lift up with the added thought of lifting up in order to carry away; and 4. to remove. In translating this word by the verb ‘cut off’ the majority of translators have obviously chosen the fourth of these meanings. But the verse makes better sense and the sequence of verbs is better if the first and primary meaning of the word is taken. In that case the sentence would read, ‘Every branch in me that does not bear fruit he lifts up,’ that is, to keep it from trailing on the ground…it is not at all strange to emphasize that the gardener first lifts the branches up so that they may be better exposed to the sun and so the fruit will develop properly…to translate the word ‘airo’ by ‘lifts up’ gives a proper sequence to the Father’s care of the vineyard, indicated by the verb that follows. Thus, he first of all lifts the vines up. Then he cuts off the unproductive elements, carefully cleansing the vine of insects, moss, or parasites that otherwise would hinder the growth of the plant.” (4) This is spiritual food for thought, is it not?

Finally, we encourage others by our kingdom living, by abiding in Christ. God has prepared our hearts, planted us in his vineyard and continually stimulates our growth. As our faith is strengthened it spills over into the lives of others, if we remain in Christ. “For it is all for your sake, so that as grace extends to more and more people it may increase thanksgiving, to the glory of God.” (2 Corinthians 4:15) As we employ God’s grace in our lives, others will see its fruit and give thanks to God. As a matter of fact, we will bear “much fruit” (vs. 5, 8)!

“Abide in me, and I in you. As the branch cannot bear fruit by itself, unless it abides in the vine, neither can you, unless you abide in me.  I am the vine; you are the branches. Whoever abides in me and I in him, he it is that bears much fruit, for apart from me you can do nothing.” (John 15:4-5) Boice writes, “The key sentence in…[vs. 4-5] can mean one of three things. It can be a simple declarative…a promise…Or it can be a command meaning, ‘Remain in me and, thus, see to it that I for my part also remain in you’…we have the following: great work to be done, the possibility of attempting to do it, but without Christ, and the inevitable failure that must result from such effort.” (5) We have a truth, a promise, and a command to bear fruit by the gospel of Jesus Christ. Only his healthy branches can produce the sweet food of eternal life. Will we embrace God’s maintenance plan for our spiritual health to be productive? Will our kingdom living in 2020 encourage others in their kingdom living? “…whoever keeps his word, in him truly the love of God is perfected. By this we may know that we are in him: whoever says he abides in him ought to walk in the same way in which he walked.” (1 John 2:5-6)

  • (1) English Standard Version Study Bible Notes, John 15:1, (digital edition), Crossway, 2008.
  • (2) Calvin, John, Calvin’s Commentary on John 15, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/john-15.html
  • (3) Boice, James, Boice Expositional Commentary Series, John 15:1-5, Baker Books, Software version, 1998.
  • (4) Boice, ibid.
  • (5) ESV Study Bible Notes, ibid

 

January 3, 2020

Ending 2019 with Christ’s Shalom

How is your year ending? Do you review your 2019 events with a Christmas letter, or take stock of your spiritual progress? Do you have goals or prayers for 2020? Every December, between Christmas and New Year’s I, ask the Lord to give me Scripture to guide my sanctification for the new year, rather than “resolutions.” This year God has shown me the tremendous value of time spent with my brothers and sisters in Christ. However, I seemed to have jumped right into my prayer for next year, which is humbling, challenging, and somewhat embarrassing. It appears that I need to work on my problem with pride that is rooted in an old attachment to rebelliousness. Thank God for his help in exposing our sins and their roots. I was a rebel from the time I was young, rejecting not only my Jewish heritage, but my parent’s rules, societal restraints, and the expectations of most of my authorities and elders. By the time I was 17, I was a rebel hippie, self-righteous, and completely lost. My only offense for my confusion and insecurity was rebelliousness. I give thanks for the Holy Spirit, who works in me, through his redemption in Christ, to see myself his soldier instead of a rebel. I also thank him for revealing lingering threads of attraction for movie and TV characters, politicians, and musicians as lost as I was in those days—rebels to the core.. The world is full of rebelliousness, even Star War’s heroes are rebels—and they offer no peace whatsoever. No wonder the Lord led me to end the year with this passage from Isaiah: “Thus says the Lord, your Redeemer, the Holy One of Israel: ‘I am the Lord your God, who teaches you to profit, who leads you in the way you should go. Oh that you had paid attention to my commandments! Then your peace would have been like a river, and your righteousness like the waves of the sea; your offspring would have been like the sand, and your descendants like its grains; their name would never be cut off or destroyed from before me.’” (Isaiah 48:17-19)

God, our holy Redeemer, calls us to pay attention to Him for true peace and security. The passage begins with an acknowledgment of the Lord’s character as the One who emancipates his people—Israel in the Old Covenant and believers in the New Covenant. Isaiah knows him as his Lord and master, as Israel’s rescuer, and Israel’s promised Messiah, the Holy One. “The preface to this message is both awful and encouraging: Thus saith Jehovah, the eternal God, thy Redeemer…[who] will be faithful to the engagement, for he is the Holy One, that cannot deceive, the Holy One of Israel, that will not deceive them. The same words that introduce the law, and give authority to that, introduce the promise, and give validity to that: ‘I am the Lord thy God, whom thou mayest depend upon as in relation to thee and in covenant with thee.” (1) “Behold, I have refined you, but not as silver; I have tried you in the furnace of affliction. For my own sake, for my own sake, I do it, for how should my name be profaned? My glory I will not give to another.” (Isaiah 48:10-11) Movie and book heroes, philanthropists, scientists, and physicians cannot save us from our entrapment in rebellion and self-centeredness. Only God is omnipotent, steadfastly gracious and merciful, using his ordained providence for our good, and the One to liberate us from Satan’s grasp permanently. Whenever we put our trust in anything or anyone else, for our spiritual security, we are rebelling against Christ, our Redeemer. Perhaps our meditation on these words will help us to pay more attention to and apply the doctrines of Christ and the gospel for our peace. God calls us to listen carefully to him: “I am the Lord your God, who teaches you to profit, who leads you in the way you should go. Oh that you had paid attention to my commandments!”

Those who genuinely know and love Christ want to hear from him, to sense his presence and the Holy Spirit’s guidance. He calls believers to come near, just as he did Israel, through the prophet Isaiah’s ministry. “Draw near to me, hear this: from the beginning I have not spoken in secret, from the time it came to be I have been there.’ And now the Lord God has sent me, and his Spirit.” (Isaiah 48:16) It sounds simple, since we know the way we should go is in Christ, our profit is from the doctrines and promises fulfilled in him. But the world offers many things that are unprofitable and tempting, not to mention the desires we all have that compete with our spiritual calling. The benefit we obtain in Christ is not only more reliable, but the means by which we will persevere in this life, through these obstacles. However, as we take stock at the end of the year, it may be helpful to hear God saying to us, in the past tense, “Oh that you had paid attention to my commandments!” How many have we ignored by the sin of omission? Or sidestepped when they seemed burdensome, made so by our legalism? I know I should help my neighbors, but I don’t like to cook or fix things. So what? Do something else, or just visit with them and get to know them; go out for coffee together. I know I should read the Bible more but my mornings are so hectic. So we find another time, make another time to set aside for contemplation, to withdraw from the world for our profit. John Gill reminds us that those “Whom God redeems, he teaches; he teaches to profit by affliction, and then makes them partakers of his holiness. Also, by his grace he leads them in the way of duty; and by his providence he leads in the way of deliverance.” (2) We squander the blessings of Christ’s atonement, through which “…the blood of Christ, who through the eternal Spirit offered himself without blemish to God, purify our conscience from dead works to serve the living God.” (Hebrews 9:14)

All of God’s instructions and commands have consequences. If Israel had not engaged in idol worship, but turned toward God, and submitted to his commands, they would not have been expelled from the Promised Land. “Then your peace would have been like a river, and your righteousness like the waves of the sea…’” (Isaiah 48:18) The picture Isaiah paints is that of a sea of righteousness with a river flowing to it. “Large, abundant, numerous as the waves of the sea; which may regard acts of justice and righteousness, which are the support of a people and state, and blessings the fruit thereof; and which God of his goodness bestows on such a people, as all kind of prosperity, protection, safety, and continuance.” That is “what could have been,” for Israel and perhaps for us in 2019. (3) But the cost of neglecting and disobeying God’s commands was catastrophic for Israel. Maybe we need to look back and see if it valid for us this year because “Even if God’s prophecies of the future were difficult to believe, his practical commandments lay within range of human understanding.” (4)  Jesus Christ, our holy Redeemer, calls us to pay attention to him for our peace and security. He calls us to pay attention to and apply the biblical doctrines and gospel for our faith to enjoy the blessings of shalom.

Will you ask the Lord to strengthen your obedience and faithfulness in the new year? I happened upon an excellent tool to use, from Tim Challis’s twitter feed: “Ten Questions for a New Year,” by Don Whitney. (5) Maybe we should use these instead of worrying about New Year’s resolutions we probably won’t keep. How did God and Isaiah encourage Israel as he released them from their captivity? “Go out from Babylon, flee from Chaldea, declare this with a shout of joy, proclaim it, send it out to the end of the earth; say, ‘The Lord has redeemed his servant Jacob!’” (Isaiah 48:20) Let us leave 2019 and enter the New Year proclaiming the good news of our salvation, in whatever way we are able, as soldiers of Christ.

(1) Henry, Matthew, Complete Commentary on the Bible, Isaiah 48:17, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/isaiah-48.html

(2) Gill, John, “John Gill’s Exposition on the Whole Bible,” Isaiah 48:18, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-48.html

(3) Gill, ibid.

(4) English Standard Version Study Bible Notes, Isaiah 48:17-19, (digital edition), Crossway, 2008.

(5) Whitney, Don, “Ten Questions for the New Year, https://www.desiringgod.org/articles/ten-questions-for-a-new-year

 

December 27, 2019

A Joyful, Peaceful Christmas in Christ

When I scan the news headlines on my phone, Buzz Feed’s daily post often captures my attention. Usually, there is a list of products that we can’t live without (or so they say). The one recently I couldn’t seem to resist reading was about small, inexpensive products that will “change your life.” But even though I am fascinated, I never order any of the products. So why does the feed  continue to capture my attention? I wish it were just my curiosity, but I confess that some part of me thinks my life would improve if I had one of the things advertised. I thank God for restraining me as my better nature clicks in, and I come to my senses. This week’s passage seems to have curbed my desire for the trivial things of the world, preferring the little things of God instead, that he uses for his grand mission of redemption. “But you, O Bethlehem Ephrathah, who are too little to be among the clans of Judah, from you shall come forth for me one who is to be ruler in Israel, whose coming forth is from of old, from ancient days. Therefore he shall give them up until the time when she who is in labor has given birth; then the rest of his brothers shall return to the people of Israel. And he shall stand and shepherd his flock in the strength of the Lord, in the majesty of the name of the Lord his God. And they shall dwell secure, for now he shall be great to the ends of the earth. And he shall be their peace.” (Micah 5:2-5) Christ, a humble babe from an insignificant city, is our Great Shepherd of peace through his divinity and his human birth, life, death, and resurrection. It is my prayer that we will experience spiritual revival this Christmas as we meditate deeply on Christ’s humility and victory through his human incarnation.

We know that God does great things with the humble and little. Out of David’s birthplace came his heir, the Lion of Judah, to be the ultimate King, as foretold by the prophets. Other Old Testament passages remind us that David, Israel’s greatest human king, was also a humble shepherd born in Bethlehem (2 Samuel 7:13, 16). It was all according to God’s plan, for His glory and to accomplish his purpose, “you shall come forth for me” (v. 2). But, “This is not the way with human kings and kingdoms. On the contrary, history shows the kingdoms of this world rising and falling across the centuries. The normal course of the kingdoms of this world is described in a striking way in Daniel. (Dan. 5:18, 20–22). All human kings and kingdoms follow this course. God lets a man rise above his fellows in power, he is overcome with pride, and eventually God brings him down.” (1) The gospel of Jesus Christ, seen through the lens of his incarnation, turns everything upside down. Instead of wanting things to improve our lives, we can turn away from them to seek Christ. Instead of putting our hope in more, better, and bigger, we learn to be small, humble, and insignificant, to exalt Christ. Bethlehem suffered from famine in Ruth’s time, in spite of it being the “house of bread.” Bethlehem was too little for Judah’s reputation as the tribe of kings, yet it was here that our Savior was born. My life, and perhaps yours, is obscure and known only to a few people compared to the presidents and prime ministers of the world. Yet God can do mighty, magnificent, grand works through our short existences on this earth when we yield to his plan, known from ancient days. The peace we have with the Lord by his Spirit in Christ did not originate with Jesus’s incarnation but from eons before that. Our redemption and reconciliation with the Lord is part of God’s grandest, most significant, most compelling work; let’s not diminish or weaken its grandeur by our Christmas “celebrations” with trivia; there’s nothing trivial about God’s redemption.

Our desire to improve our lives and distract us from our pain and troubles drives us to find new products, conveniences, and pursuits. We don’t want to suffer as Israel did in their exile, driven away from their homes into foreign lands and alien cultures. But Micah predicted that “…he shall give them up until the time when she who is in labor has given birth; then the rest of his brothers shall return to the people of Israel.” (5:3) God will bring glory out of Israel’s pain according to His timing, not his peoples’ impatience. God’s people had no king, no home, and no temple for seventy years. They had no control over their return to Jerusalem and had to wait for the Lord’s intercession. In the same way, Israel remained for four hundred years, until Mary’s labor, waiting for their Savior-King. And then God’s people waited another thirty-three years for the “rest of his brothers” to come to faith in the Messiah at Pentecost. (2) When the angel pronounced God’s plan to a little, insignificant woman named Mary, could she or anyone grasp the greatness of his birth? “And behold, you will conceive in your womb and bear a son, and you shall call his name Jesus. He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. And the Lord God will give to him the throne of his father David, and he will reign over the house of Jacob forever, and of his kingdom there will be no end.” (Luke 1:31-33) It’s one thing to hear or read the promise; it’s another to absorb and live in the reality of King Jesus born as a weak, underprivileged, dependent infant to a common, poor, but chosen woman. Christ, our Savior, rose out of Israel’s painful past.

Christ brings us peace and security while we are living our sinful, rebellious, ignorant lives, rebellious toward the living God. We have done less than little—nothing—to achieve this spectacular resolution, a Christmas miracle. “And he shall stand and shepherd his flock in the strength of the Lord, in the majesty of the name of the Lord his God. And they shall dwell secure, for now he shall be great to the ends of the earth. And he shall be their peace.” (Micah 5:4-5) This Christmas, we might consider the humanity and divinity of our Savior, without which there would be no redemption or peace. He is the Lion of Judah and the Lamb of God. The broken body of our propitiation. Life everlasting and in the grave for three days. Eternally preincarnate and a carpenter’s son. The Lamb and the Shepherd. Predicted and yet surprising. Finished and interceding. “He endured death as a lamb; he devoured it as a lion.” (Saint Augustine) This is our Jesus, born for our everlasting joyful peace with God. “…In him, in whom they are chosen and preserved; in his love, from which they can never be separated; in his hands, out of which none can pluck them; in his church, where they shall ever remain; and so may be considered as a promise of the perseverance of the saints in faith and holiness to the end…” (3)

“In John 10, where Jesus calls himself ‘the good shepherd,’ there are two explanations of why he is so designated. First, Jesus is the good shepherd because he [voluntarily] laid down his life for the sheep…The second explanation of why Jesus is the good shepherd is that he knows his sheep and is known by them (John 10:14)…To be known by Jesus is to be a member of his flock and therefore to be one for whom he died. It is to be one who will never be snatched from his hand, as he says later. Nothing about us will ever suddenly rise up to startle our divine Shepherd-King and diminish his love .” (3) “He will tend his flock like a shepherd; he will gather the lambs in his arms; he will carry them in his bosom, and gently lead those that are with young.” (Isaiah 40:11) Thinking deeply about these truths reminds us of Christ’s humility and victory through his human incarnation, and prayerfully results in spiritual revival.

“For he himself is our peace, who has made us both one and has broken down in his flesh the dividing wall of hostility by abolishing the law of commandments expressed in ordinances, that he might create in himself one new man in place of the two, so making peace, and might reconcile us both to God in one body through the cross, thereby killing the hostility. And he came and preached peace to you who were far off and peace to those who were near. For through him we both have access in one Spirit to the Father. So then you are no longer strangers and aliens, but you are fellow citizens with the saints and members of the household of God, built on the foundation of the apostles and prophets, Christ Jesus himself being the cornerstone, in whom the whole structure, being joined together, grows into a holy temple in the Lord. In him you also are being built together into a dwelling place for God by the Spirit.” (Ephesians 2:14-22) Merry Christmas!

(1) Boice, James, Boice Expositional Commentary Series, Micah 5, Baker Books, Software version, 1998.

(2) Zondervan Bible Commentary, F. F. Bruce General Editor, Micah 5:3, One-Volume Illustrated Digital Edition

(3) Gill, John, “John Gill’s Exposition on the Whole Bible,” Micah 5:5 https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/micah-5.html

(4) Boice, ibid.

December 20, 2019

Building Real Christmas Peace

It’s party time. It’s the time of the year when neighbors, companies, churches, and friends gather to “celebrate the season.” Yesterday a friend remarked that her company has Christmas parties at the same time they are closing out the last quarter’s work for the year. I remember that feeling—when I was trying to finish grading papers for student-teachers before the end of the year. One theme I hear, from both working and retired adults, is the desire for peace. But the peace that comes as a result of finishing a task, for work or parties, is not the peace of Christ. We are designed by God to be relational creatures, so our greatest peace is in our relationships with family members, friends, co-workers, neighbors, church members, fellow volunteers, and community residents. Who we are with others is either the most satisfying or the most disappointing aspect of life. Having people who support, encourage, and strengthen our devotion to Christ is more important than we may realize. All of God’s work in Scripture involves groups of people. All the leaders in the Old Testament—Abraham, Isaac, Jacob, Joseph, Moses, Aaron, Joshua, were significant because of their work on behalf of God for Israel. The apostles, disciples, women, and followers of Jesus Christ grew the kingdom of God through their work together. So why do we think that substantial Christian spiritual growth happens as individuals? Thomas Brooks writes, “…self is a great hindrance to divine things; therefore the prophets and apostles were usually carried out of themselves, when they had the clearest, choicest, highest, and most glorious visions. Self-seeking so blinds the soul, that it cannot see a beauty in Christ, nor an excellency in holiness; it distempers the palate, that a man cannot taste sweetness in the word of God, nor in the ways of God, nor in the society of the people of God…There is nothing that speaks a man to be more empty and void of God, Christ, and grace, than self-seeking…There is not a greater hindrance to all the duties of piety than self-seeking. Oh! This is that which keeps many a soul from looking after God and the precious things of eternity…Self-seeking is that which puts many a man upon neglecting and slighting the things of his peace.” (1) I can personally testify that it is both easy and dangerous to be self-seeking in our spiritual growth.

What Scripture led me to the idea or corporate peace? It is not a gospel passage that focuses on Christ rather than me, which we would expect. Like Philippians 2:1-4, “So if there is any encouragement in Christ, any comfort from love, any participation in the Spirit, any affection and sympathy, complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. Do nothing from selfish ambition or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves. Let each of you look not only to his own interests, but also to the interests of others.” What a great passage to counteract the Christmas madness! But it is an Old Testament passage that brought me to consider our corporate dedication to Christ—2 Chronicles 14:2-7. “And Asa did what was good and right in the eyes of the Lord his God. He took away the foreign altars and the high places and broke down the pillars and cut down the Asherim and commanded Judah to seek the Lord, the God of their fathers, and to keep the law and the commandment. He also took out of all the cities of Judah the high places and the incense altars. And the kingdom had rest under him. He built fortified cities in Judah, for the land had rest. He had no war in those years, for the Lord gave him peace. And he said to Judah, ‘Let us build these cities and surround them with walls and towers, gates and bars. The land is still ours, because we have sought the Lord our God. We have sought him, and he has given us peace on every side.’ So they built and prospered.” King Asa’s knowledge of the Lord, his obedience, and conformity to God’s will was a good restart for Israel. Perhaps this Christmas, we might apply Asa’s conduct to ourselves by renewing our devotion to the Lord and using our peace to strengthen our corporate commitment to Christ.

Asa took down the idols and altars and pillars honoring them; commanded Israel to seek and obey God; and removed all the high places out of Judah’s cities. As a result of the peace God provided, Asa built up fortified cities for future wars and commanded Israel to prepare by building cities, saying twice that they should do so because they sought God and he gave them peace. Judah prospered. In summary, Asa broke, cut down, and removed idols before building up Judah’s defenses. “Asa did what was good and right in the eyes of the Lord.” It is God’s desire that we tear down idols, not just in our own minds and hearts, but corporately, to have peace with God as a body. How did Asa and Israel, and the writer of 2 Chronicles know that God was the reason for their peace? Is he not the first cause of all events and circumstances? Whatever instruments the Lord used, he brought Israel peace. The Ten Commandments, forbidding idolatry was a good gift from Yahweh to his people. The King started with great devotion to God by leading Israel to worship him alone through his example and rule. “Interpreters agree that the Mosaic laws, rightly understood, still give Christians wisdom about the kind of conduct that pleases or displeases God.” (2) “Asa aimed at pleasing God and studied to approve himself to him. Happy are those that walk by this rule, not to do that which is right in their own eyes, or in the eye of the world, but which is so in God’s sight. We find by experience that it is good to seek the Lord; it gives us rest; while we pursue the world, we meet with nothing but vexation.” (3)

Asa started his work of spiritual renovation, led Israel to participate, and then continued the practice. It was not enough for him to begin; the work needed to continue. Unfortunately, his efforts later waned, and Ethiopia invaded Judah. Taking the liberty of making another spiritual application, we have here an encouragement to keep up our communal spiritual invigoration and a warning that if we stop, we will be overtaken by the world and its influences, as Israel was. The work of Christ is that which is accomplished together by having hearts united to build the kingdom. It’s mystery is accomplished by the work of God’s Spirit, built on our faithful conformity to the Lord’s Word and will. Paul refers to and describes this mystery in his epistles as “…hearts…encouraged, being knit together in love, to reach all the riches of full assurance of understanding and the knowledge of God’s mystery, which is Christ, in whom are hidden all the treasures of wisdom and knowledge.” He desires this heart-unity for the Colossians as a body, including himself. “For though I am absent in body, yet I am with you in spirit, rejoicing to see your good order and the firmness of your faith in Christ.” (Colossians 2:2-5) (See also Ephesians 3:1-9; Colossians 1:26-27; 4:3.) We do not honor God with our independence but with our humble, biblical interdependence. And when we obtain shared peace, we, like Asa, can build up our defenses again the enemies of the world, Satan, and even our ungodly desires and temptations.

Today, at a secular meeting, a friend told me that she knows how much I love Jesus, as she does. I was delighted by her initiation of a spiritual conversation in our happy, chatty group when most conversations were about family and travel plans over the holidays. She encouraged me so much, and I hope to pass on the encouragement to you. God has given many of us peace, so we have no excuse to neglect building up our defenses against Christ’s enemies. Let’s agree to tear down the idols that challenge Jesus—materialism, sentimentality, Santa, food—whatever threatens our gospel peace—together. “Take care, lest you make a covenant with the inhabitants of the land to which you go, lest it become a snare in your midst. You shall tear down their altars and break their pillars and cut down their Asherim (for you shall worship no other god, for the Lord, whose name is Jealous, is a jealous God).” (Exodus 34:12-14) Lord, help us who belong to Christ to boldly honor you together this Christmas.

(1) Brooks, Thomas. Precious Remedies Against Satan’s Devices (p. 106). Kindle Edition.

(2) English Standard Version Study Bible Notes, Exodus 20, (digital edition), Crossway, 2008.

(3) Henry, Matthew “Matthew Henry’s Complete Commentary on the Bible,” 2 Chronicles 14, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/2chronicles-14.html

December 13, 2019

Peaceful Comfort

As usual, on Wednesday, before posting my devotion, I started to write my draft. I had been studying the passage since Saturday, asking the Lord to use it in my sanctification, before attempting to craft anything useful for you. Since the passage pictures God as a mother caring for her child, Israel, my mind wandered, and I found myself reading blog posts by one of my favorite authors for World Magazine, Andree Seu Peterson. One blog post is about her list-making, a trait that she shares with her mother. I can relate. My mother was organized, if nothing else. She writes, “My mother was not warm (as I learned only as an adult from comparing notes with friends), but she made lists! Which put me in good standing for adulthood. If I had to choose only one… trait(s) in a person raising me, I would be hard-pressed to forfeit the trait of organization for a little extra warmth. I turned out alright. … Didn’t I?” (1) But at the end of her post, she says, “I like the short list Evan Roberts went around Wales exhorting Welshmen to in the 1904 Revival: ‘Confess all known sin; get rid of everything doubtful; obey the Spirit immediately; proclaim Christ publicly.’ Hard to improve on a list like that.” (2) The is the mothering Spirit that we have, we who have Christ. I hope I am like Peterson, with a view toward the list of gospel blessings more than any list of Christmas to-dos or presents to buy. After all, spiritual peace does not come from purchases, getting things done, or sending a card. Maybe meditating on Isaiah 66:12-13 will help us all to have a little more peace. “For thus says the Lord: ‘Behold, I will extend peace to her like a river, and the glory of the nations like an overflowing stream; and you shall nurse, you shall be carried upon her hip, and bounced upon her knees. As one whom his mother comforts, so I will comfort you; you shall be comforted in Jerusalem.”

God’s love for Israel is motherly, comforting, peaceful, and glorious. The Lord invited his children then and us now to draw near to him for comfort when the world tries to pull us away from him. Like us who wait for Christ’s return, Israel was promised a glorious future peace. “For thus says the Lord: ‘Behold, I will extend peace to her like a river, and the glory of the nations like an overflowing stream…” (12a) Not only will Israel find peace at the end of their exile, but God’s glory and blessings will flow out from his people. John Gill brings this application to the verse: “As the river Euphrates or as the Nile, which overflowed Egypt, and made it fruitful; or as any flowing river, large and spreading, continuing to flow, and brings blessings with it where it comes; and so denotes the abundance of this peace, the perpetuity of it, and its blessed effects…Christ the peacemaker came and made peace by his blood, and went and preached peace to Jews and Gentiles, and many enjoyed spiritual peace in believing, flowing from his blood and righteousness…since the Gentiles had formerly lived luxuriously, and had enjoyed a vast abundance of everything desirable, he affirms that all riches, and everything that belongs to a happy life, shall be possessed by believers, as the rivers run into the sea….By ‘constant flowing’ he denotes continuance…God is an inexhaustible fountain, his peace differs widely from the peace of the world, which quickly passes away and is dried up.” (2)

As a baby sucks on the breasts of his mother, so we can enjoy the comfort of rest, peace, and security in our Lord. Because God is sovereignly providential, we may have this comfort not only in our homes but out in our hectic, materialistic, narcissistic, success-driven world. Remembering that the prophets spoke for their “today,” their future, and ours, we find comfort their words from the Lord. “You shall suck the milk of nations; you shall nurse at the breast of kings; and you shall know that I, the Lord, am your Savior and your Redeemer, the Mighty One of Jacob.” (Isaiah 60:16) “The powerful people of this world will no longer trample on God’s people but will care for them. This poetic imagery pictures the people of God as infants and pictures other nations—even leaders of nations—as caring for them…God will move his people from their cynical unbelief…to a wondering acknowledgment of him.” (3) Is this not the peace we have in Christ? Every Christmas we celebrate the birth of our Savior just as we celebrate his death in communion, to remember his atoning, reconciling sacrifice—the reason for his incarnation. In chapter 66 Isaiah declares, “…and you shall nurse, you shall be carried upon her hip, and bounced upon her knees.” (v. 12b) “When he takes pleasure in us as infants, and not as men of mature age, we ought to acknowledge our condition, that we may be satisfied with such consolations. And indeed it is a token of remarkable condescension that he thus bears with our weakness. The Lord wishes to be to us in the room of a mother, that, instead of the annoyances, reproaches, distresses, and anxieties, which we have endured, he may treat us gently, and, as it were, fondle us in his bosom.” (4) We don’t need more stuff, more food, or more parties; what we need is the comfort of Christ’s peace and security—less world, more God.

“The final section of Isaiah consists of oracles and teaching addressed to those who lived in Judah shortly after the exile, towards the end of the sixth century B.C…to those who lived in a period of instability and hardship, and who were aware that many of God’s promises remained as yet unfulfilled, this note was vital. The book thus ends by offering both exhortation and inspiration: a discouraging today is to be lived in the light of a glorious tomorrow…[Isaiah 66] verses 7–16 revert to an earlier theme, the future well-being of Jerusalem, depicted in terms of a mother and her offspring.” (5) In Isaiah 66:13, comfort is mentioned three times: “As one whom his mother comforts, so I will comfort you; you shall be comforted in Jerusalem.” “It is wonderful that the Prophet…dwells on [comfort] so largely. But, because he can neither express the greatness and warmth of the love which God bears toward us, nor satisfy himself with speaking about it, for that reason he mentions and repeats it frequently.” (6) Perhaps this is the reason we enjoy singing lovely Christmas songs and hymns, to try to grasp the idea of the great comfort we have in Christ. Maybe this is why we have such a strong tendency toward sentimentality this season, longing for forgotten traditions. Our souls yearn for the deep comfort that we only find in God. But like Israel, we are afflicted people by our sins and temptations. We drive ourselves into exile rather than deny the flesh of its desires. Like Israel, we need to be reminded continually of the acceptance, mercy, and forgiveness we have in God.

Do you have God’s peace to extend to others like an overflowing stream? If not, how can you obtain Christ’s glorious peace, and then when can you share it with others? For what might you need comfort, that you generally try to avoid? Will you turn to the Lord for your comfort instead of looking for the solution in the world or from people who are also looking for comfort? Do you have a peaceful, comforting home or a stressful, challenging one? How can your home become a place of peace and rest, your Jerusalem, where God dwells? “I, I am he who comforts you…” (Isaiah 51:12a)

(1) Peterson, Andree Sue, “On Making Lists,” World Magazine, https://world.wng.org/2019/09/on_making_lists

(2) Gill, John, “John Gill’s Exposition on the Whole Bible,” Isaiah 66:12, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-66.html

(3) “English Standard Version Study Bible Notes,” Isaiah 60:16, (digital edition), Crossway, 2008.

(4) Calvin, John, “Calvin’s Commentary on the Bible,” Isaiah 66:12, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-66.html

(5) “Zondervan Bible Commentary,” F. F. Bruce General Editor, Isaiah 60-66 Summary, One-Volume Illustrated Digital Edition

(6) Calvin, John, “Calvin’s Commentary on the Bible,” Isaiah 66:13, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/isaiah-66.html

December 5, 2019

Peace Trumps Sentimentality

For someone who doesn’t put much stock in sentimentality, I’m feeling pretty schmaltzy. I enjoyed a lovely Thanksgiving afternoon with friends who are either retired missionaries or military. We spent much of our time over dinner asking each other questions and reminiscing about our pasts. I’m at home with my lighted artificial Christmas tree ready for decorating, but I’m waiting for one special little girl to help me. I did not have any particular Thanksgiving rituals and no Christmas whatsoever in my childhood. Today I saw the new Mr. Roger’s film “It’s a Beautiful Day,” but I had never seen his show as a child. So, unlike most of those watching, I wasn’t thinking back about my past during the film. But I did use some of Rogers’s articles in a teacher training program in Africa. I grew to appreciate his positive philosophy toward disciplining children. Rogers’s Christian faith may seem to be the foundation of his philosophy, but there is a crucial difference between his psychological perspective and biblical Christianity. Jesus is not sentimental; he is future-oriented—something Rogers sought to deemphasize in favor of the present.

The redeemed of God will be surrounded and crowned with joy and peace when sorrow and sighing flee away in the glorious future. “And the ransomed of the Lord shall return and come to Zion with singing; everlasting joy shall be upon their heads; they shall obtain gladness and joy, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.” (Isaiah 35:10) “For you shall go out in joy and be led forth in peace; the mountains and the hills before you shall break forth into singing, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands.” (Isaiah 55:12) These passages from the prophet Isaiah point to the truths that provide peace when our world crashes on us like mad waves in a turbulent sea. Christ has ransomed us—out of bondage with joy & peace. All of creation rejoices over Christ freeing believers in this life. Believers are surrounded and by joy and gladness, not only in the future but now, in this life.

The peace that the world tries to create or engender over Christmas is fake. Peace based on human goodness, possessions, or the emotional comfort of traditions only slightly approximates that which Christ offers. Even the picture in Isaiah, of the exiles coming out of Babylonian captivity with songs on their lips, falls short of the unimaginable joy that Christ’s transformed children experience through him. “The deliverance from the Babylonish kingdom was a type; when men “go out” of a state of bondage to sin, Satan, and the law; out of a state of darkness and ignorance; out of the pit of nature’s misery and distress; out of themselves and their own righteousness; out of their own sinful ways, and from among the men of the world…they go out freely, being led by the Spirit of God; who takes them by the hand as it were, and leads them in ways before unknown to them…all which is attended with “joy and peace”…finding themselves released from bondage, in a state of light and comfort, out of the horrible pit, and on a rock; brought to Christ, and clothed with his righteousness…” (1)

The singing of the ransomed in Isaiah 35:10 is coupled with a crown of everlasting joy. What a remarkable picture, since those who wear crowns, such as kings and princes, are unlikely to be singing. We would expect them to have heads held high, looking majestic and set apart from the masses. But here we have a family of God crowned with joy and singing as they come out of captivity. This picture of regenerated believers is precious, not just for our first days with Christ, but for all eternity. Our bodies age and refuse to maintain their elasticity. Our minds become filled with more and more worldly messages and influences. Our emotions suffer from losses, hurts, and disappointments. But our souls continue to sing; we have only to turn up the volume so that it becomes the strongest and loudest music in our lives. I usually have classical music playing while I study and write. But sometimes I don’t want to hear it. I don’t want the music playing when I am struggling with something when I feel distresses or under conviction, which is when I need that beautiful music the most. So I have learned to leave it on at those times and let it remind me of joy I have in my redemption. But there is no more beautiful music than that of gospel forgiveness, that moves us beyond mere quietness to biblical shalom—wellbeing of mind, soul, and heart.

Isaiah 35:10 goes on to say that “they shall obtain gladness and joy, and sorrow and sighing shall flee away.” We do not work ourselves into gospel joy but receive (obtain) it from God as a gift. When I spent taught young children and teachers of children I used beautifully wrapped empty boxes sometimes and plain brown paper bags other times, as an illustration of faith God gives us to believe in Christ. The happiness of the children in this symbolic game continues to remind me of the fact that the gladness that overcomes sorrow and sighing can only be found in Christ. Watching “It’s a Beautiful Day” two days after a funeral, with friends who have recently lost loved ones, was a delight for me. To share in something with them, knowing that our hearts are knit together in Christ—not because of the movie but because we wanted to be together, to strengthen our joy in Christ during a tough week. God’s loving election overcomes our grief and despair. Our peace is not by forgetting our beloved, who are with the Lord. We are joyful because we know that they are in the presence of the Lord, as are we. We will all be singing joyfully together in the new world he creates. This is the shalom I want over Christmas.

“In the resurrection [they] shall return from their dusty beds, and shall appear before God in Zion above; and ‘with songs’ to Father, Son, and Spirit, for what each have done for them, in election, redemption, and conversion; and for persevering grace…they shall then enter into joy, which will never end; there will be nothing to interrupt it to all eternity…there will be no more sin and unbelief, or any other corruption of nature; no more darkness and desertion; no more of any of Satan’s temptations; no more distresses, inward or outward; and so no more sighing within, nor sorrowing without; all tears will be wiped away.” (2) “For the Lamb in the midst of the throne will be their shepherd, and he will guide them to springs of living water, and God will wipe away every tear from their eyes…He will wipe away every tear from their eyes, and death shall be no more, neither shall there be mourning, nor crying, nor pain anymore, for the former things have passed away.” (Revelation 7:17; 21:4)

When we are brought out of our dungeons of sin, all creation rejoices in the grace of Christ that will redeem it one day. “For you shall go out in joy and be led forth in peace; the mountains and the hills before you shall break forth into singing, and all the trees of the field shall clap their hands.” (Isaiah 55:12) If the mountains, hills, and trees are singing and clapping, how much more should our souls rejoice in gospel shalom? Not that we need to move through the holidays with a smile plastered on our faces or sing when we feel like crying. But deep in our beings, do we not have the peace of Christ soothing our sorrows? It’s not unusual for me to have to stop singing a hymn at church when I become overwhelmed with joy at the love of Christ evident in words. Is this not joy? I hope to encourage you to peacefully celebrate your present redemption and the future redemption of the world this Christmas. “Our joyful hopes and prospects of eternal life should swallow up all the sorrows and all the joys of this present time…Let us try ourselves by…questions, rather than spend time on things that may be curious and amusing, but are unprofitable.” (3) So here are some questions to consider: What is the loudest voice or music in your life—news, commercials, YouTube videos, movies? How can you turn up the volume of gospel joy? How do you experience and express the peace and joy of being ransomed from a life of sin? Do you view God’s creation and the innumerable ways that it is useful and good, as alive and joyful, or as dead and merely products to be manipulated? How might your view of it change if you think of creation rejoicing, especially in Christ’s future redemption? How might having everlasting joy help you to cope and appreciate your challenges now?

“Hear the word of the Lord, O nations, and declare it in the coastlands far away; say, ‘He who scattered Israel will gather him and will keep him as a shepherd keeps his flock.’ For the Lord has ransomed Jacob and has redeemed him from hands too strong for him. They shall come and sing aloud on the height of Zion, and they shall be radiant over the goodness of the Lord.” (Jeremiah 31:10-12a)

(1) Gill, John, “John Gill’s Exposition on the Whole Bible,” Isaiah 35:10, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-35.html

(2) Ibid

(3) Henry, Matthew “Matthew Henry’s Complete Commentary on the Bible,” Isaiah 35:10, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/mhm/isaiah-35.html 

November 30, 2019

Thanks for Peaceful Mercy & Justice

No matter how much we dislike the quarrelsomeness of the American impeachment process, we can appreciate the fact that U.S. law allows for the investigation of possible infractions by those in high, powerful positions. Unfortunately, the process brings out the worst in some people, just as everything does. But, it also brings out the best in some. The benefit of a seasoned democracy that allows for freedom of speech is significant. I am particularly sensitive to the privilege of free speech, having lived in five countries with young democracies. While I cringe at some of the questions and comments made during the current hearings, I trust God to bring about the best result—not just for the president, but for every person involved or listening to the hearings. The Lord uses every aspect of life to strengthen our faith by its application, helping us to rely on him, the God of justice. “For thus said the Lord God, the Holy One of Israel, ‘In returning and rest you shall be saved; in quietness and in trust shall be your strength. But you were unwilling, and you said, ‘No! We will flee upon horses’; therefore you shall flee away; and, ‘We will ride upon swift steeds’; therefore your pursuers shall be swift’…the Lord waits to be gracious to you, and therefore he exalts himself to show mercy to you. For the Lord is a God of justice; blessed are all those who wait for him.” (Isaiah 30:15-16, 18) God’s timely mercy for believers strengthens, blesses, and brings us back to him for the blessing of shalom in Christ.

Our passage begins with an encouraging, uplifting proclamation of God’s desire to rescue his people from their wrong ways. “Isaiah warns his people—and Assyria—against the folly of self-trust, promising God’s abundant blessings to those who trust him (Ch. 28)…God will both punish and save Jerusalem, though Jerusalemites in their hypocrisy try to control him through false worship (Ch. 29)…When his people are faithless, God remains faithful. (Ch. 30)” (1) We who have the indwelling Spirit know that he uses Old Testament warnings to alert us to our waywardness. We who have studied God’s Word and experienced its power to transform our minds respect Scripture’s authority and application to our lives. Here is a warning for us about our self-trust. Here is a principle—our Lord both disciplines and prospers us. Here is a promise—God will remain faithful despite our faithlessness. Here is shalom for believers. No “ifs” attached, but no immediacy ascribed to God’s timing either. The salvation God provides in Jesus Christ is outside of our control and in his time. It’s hard to wait when we long for family members and friends to be redeemed. We want everyone to have the quietness, peace, and strength of the Spirit in Christ. God has plans that are unknown to us. As we wait, he wants us to put our complete confidence in him. If we wander, like Israel, “In returning and rest you shall be saved,” and his peace reinforces our faith; “in quietness and in trust shall be your strength” (Isaiah 30:15).

When the prophets communicated God’s word to Israel, the people, “were unwilling, and…said, ‘No! We will flee upon horses…We will ride upon swift steeds.’” You and I like to think that we’ll be strengthened by information, notifications, apps, achievements, physical endurance, or mental prowess. But we’re weakened, not fortified by our dependence upon our “horses.” Like Israel, God will use our idols to bring us to our knees. The more we depend upon others’ opinions, the less we will trust our own. As we submit with more frequency to the influences of the loud few, less often will we hear the quiet voice of the Spirit. As our anticipation for achievements increases, our peacefulness decreases, and so does our ability to wait on the Lord. It’s as if we have created our own “human gospel” that says, “Let me go and labor to find rest and reward. I can do it on my own without being weak or vulnerable.” That is not a gospel but the way of an atheist who has no confidence in God. Christ says, “Come to me, all who labor and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest. Take my yoke upon you, and learn from me, for I am gentle and lowly in heart, and you will find rest for your souls. For my yoke is easy, and my burden is light.” (Matthew 11:28-30) Our strength is through submission to God, fleeing to him, not away from him.

Let us be careful of so many platitudes with little awareness of our independence. I may think I am submissive, but what do I find? The unthinking, unplanned pursuit of my own desires, regardless of their consequences? Personal opinions roughly asserted, without hesitation or regard for their hurtfulness? Procrastination of difficult conversations or invitations because I’m tired, weary, or just plain afraid? Are these not reflective of an attitude of independence, as if God is not at work, as if he can’t be trusted? Do I really want to position myself to fight my own battles or do the work of sanctification without the Spirit? The Israelites were consigning themselves to military action by refusing God’s mercy. Instead of staying put, quietly resting in God’s timing, they impatiently pursued a fight. Isn’t that what seems to be happening in our world today—people looking for a fight? Some battles are necessary, those for justice, equality, and respect. But we do great harm to ourselves when we rise up against the consequences of our sin. God’s people were in exile due to their rebelliousness, and Isaiah finds warns them about continuing in it. “The Jews were the only professing people God had in the world, yet many were rebellious. They had the light, but they loved darkness rather. The prophets checked them in their sinful pursuits, so that they could not proceed without fear [but]…They did not like to hear of his holy commandments and his hatred of sin; they desired that they might no more be reminded of these things. But as they despised the word of God, their sins undermined their safety.” (2)

Our impatience with our world is not the problem; it’s our impatience with God that threatens our peace. The world moves in its own time, out of sync with the Lord. It’s ironic, isn’t it, that a society so obsessed with syncing would be so out of step with God? Isaiah 30:18 reminds us that God has a particular time for his acts of compassion and grace. “…the Lord waits to be gracious to you, and therefore he exalts himself to show mercy to you. For the Lord is a God of justice; blessed are all those who wait for him.” “The Lord waits for the fittest and most proper time to show mercy; when things are brought to the worst, to the greatest extremity, and when his people are brought to a sense of their danger, and of their sins, and to repentance for them, and to see their need of his help and salvation, and to implore it, and to depend upon him for it; then, in the mount of difficulty, and hereby the mercy is the sweeter to them, and his grace is the more magnified towards them.” (3) Christ’s graciousness toward us when he redeems us continues in our life with him; his timing is particular and specific for our spiritual requirements—not necessarily for our physical, emotional, or intellectual desires. Our quiet and trustful dependence upon the Lord increases our thanks, which then strengthens and blesses us. As we return to him and wait on his help, we will have greater shalom. Are you experiencing Christ’s shalom as we approach Thanksgiving? Or is your gospel weak and worldly? Is your trust in God shaky? When are you most likely to assert your independence from God? For what mercy and blessing are you waiting? Are you willing to continue waiting, trusting that Jesus will give you what is needed at just the right time? Will you engage in thankfulness for God’s justice as you lean into him? “Kiss the Son…Blessed are all who take refuge in him.” (Psalms 2:12)

(1) English Standard Version Study Bible Notes, Introductory remarks on Isaiah 28, 29, 30, (digital edition), Crossway, 2008.

(2) Matthew Henry’s Concise Commentary on the Whole Bible, Isaiah 30:16, https://www.biblestudytools.com/commentaries/matthew-henry-concise/isaiah/30.html

(3) Gill, John, “John Gill’s Exposition on the Whole Bible,” Isaiah 30:18, https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/isaiah-30.html

November 22, 2019